CARES Act for Self-Directed Financial Investors: QRP, SDIRA, & Solo 401k

In this post, we focus on CARES Act implications & strategy for tax-favored self-directed retirement accounts: Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRA), Qualified Retirement Plans (QRP), Self-Directed IRAs (SDIRA), Solo 401k, Employer 401k plans & many other QRPs.

The CARES Act, short for Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, is a massive $2,000,000,000,000+ tax and spending package signed by President Trump on March 27, 2020. The CARES Act includes many forms of financial relief for businesses and individuals. Continue reading “CARES Act for Self-Directed Financial Investors: QRP, SDIRA, & Solo 401k”

What is a QRP? What is the QRP?

QRP & eQRP® have generated incredible excitement and interest within the self-directed investor community – from crypto-enthusiasts and gold & silver precious metals investors to real estate syndicators. But, there appears to be extensive misunderstanding of QRPs, so we’re here to set the record straight for you and all investors that want total financial control. For expert analysis, review, and FAQ about QRP, QRP-LLC, Solo QRP, Solo 401k & SDIRA, read on. Continue reading “What is a QRP? What is the QRP?”

Checkbook Solo 401k-QRP: 2019 Year End Maintenance

QRP & Solo 401k Contribution Deadlines

Checkbook Solo 401K and Checkbook SEP-IRA Contribution Deadline. The deadline for contributions to Self-Directed Solo 401(k) Plans and Self-Directed SEP-IRAs is the tax return due date of the business sponsoring the plan, including extensions. Therefore, the contribution deadlines depend on the type of business that sponsored the plan – sole proprietorship, partnership, S-corporation, C-corporation, or LLC taxed as any of the foregoing – and whether you timely file for a tax return filing extension. Filing extensions are especially helpful for those that want to make 2019 contributions, but don’t yet have funds available to do so by the initial required filing date.

W-2 Coordination: Forms W-2, reflecting wages and related tax-reporting for S-Corps/C-corps are filed by 1/31/2020. Therefore, you should make your employee deferral contributions ahead of then, so that they be properly reflected on your W-2.

Deferral Elections: Although deferral contributions can be made to the plan after the end of the year, deferral elections by owners of unincorporated businesses must be made by 12/31/2019. Deferral elections for owners of incorporated businesses must be paid prior to the payroll(s) from which the contribution(s) is withheld. Click here to access Solo 401k 2019 Deferral Election Forms.

QRP & Solo 401k Filing Requirements

Forms 1099-R for Solo 401k Distributions and 401k In-Plan Roth ConversionsForms 1099-R for Solo K distributions must be provided to plan participants by January 31, 2020. Forms 1099-R must be filed with the IRS by February 28, 2020 if paper filed or by April 2, 2020 if electronically filed.

Form 5500-EZ for certain Solo 401k PlansIf Solo 401k plan assets exceeded $250,000 as of December 31, 2019, a Form 5500-EZ is due to the IRS by July 31, 2020. Form 5558 (Application for Extension of Time to File Certain Employee Plan Returns) can be filed with the IRS on or before the normal due date to receive an automatic two-and-a-half-month extension to October 15. Regardless of plan asset value, Form 5500-EZ must be filed for the year in which a Solo 401k Plan is terminated. Checkbook IRAs, for which annual IRS reporting is handled by your custodian, are not required to file Forms 5500.

Forms 990-T (UBIT, UBTI, UDFI) For SDIRAsSD401(k)sSD-DB PlansRetirement accounts that generate more than $1,000 in Unrelated Business Taxable Income (UBTI), should file Form 990-T by April 15, 2020. To request an automatic extension of time to file Form 990-T use Form 8868, Application for Automatic Extension of Time To File an Exempt Organization Return.

Form 990-W (Estimated Tax on Unrelated Business Taxable Income for Tax-Exempt Organizations). If UBIT tax liability is expected to exceed $500, estimated tax payments should be made. Payments are due by the 15th day of the 4th, 6th, 9th, and 12th months of the tax year.

Solo 401k/QRP Required Minimum Distributions

  • Remember that RMDs required from 401(k) plans and 457(b) plans have to be taken separately from each of those plan accounts. Therefore, if you have more than one defined contribution plan, you must calculate and satisfy your RMDs separately for each plan and withdraw that amount from that plan. This differs from the rules that apply to IRAs, for which you may aggregate your RMD amounts for all of your IRAs and withdraw the total from one IRA or a portion from each of your IRAs.
  • Remember that designated Solo 401k-QRP Roth accounts are subject to the RMD rules. This, too, differs from the rules that apply to Roth IRAs, for which there are no RMD requirements for while the owner is alive. 
  • The penalty for failing to take an RMD is very harsh: The amount not withdrawn is taxed at 50%. The account owner should file Form 5329Additional Taxes on Qualified Plans (Including IRAs) and Other Tax-Favored Accounts, with his or her federal tax return for the year in which the full amount of the RMD was not taken. (The penalty may be waived if the account owner establishes that the shortfall in required distributions was due to reasonable error and that reasonable steps are being taken to remedy the shortfall. In order to qualify for this relief, you must file Form 5329 and attach a letter of explanation.)
  •  As a 5% or more owner of the business that sponsors a Solo 401k, you must start RMDs by April 1 of the year following the year you turn 70½, even if you are still employed by the company and have not yet retired.
  • After the first RMD, you must take subsequent RMDs by December 31 of each year, beginning with the calendar year containing your required beginning date.
  • Your RMD is generally determined by dividing the adjusted market value of your Solo 401k as of December 31 of the preceding year by the distribution period that corresponds with your age in the Uniform Lifetime Table (Table III in IRS Publication 590-B, Distributions Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs). If your spouse is your sole beneficiary and is more than 10 years younger than you, you will use the Joint Life and Last Survivor Expectancy Table (Table II in IRS Publication 590-B).

Solo 401k-QRP Year-End Maintenance Resources

Checkbook Solo 401k 2019 Contribution Calculator: Click here to access a web-based 2019 Solo 401k Contribution Calculator. Note: The calculator may be used to provide an approximation of your allowable 2019 Solo 401k contribution amount, not a precise indication of the correct amount. Your actual contribution amount should be calculated in conjunction with your tax professional. Specifically, those that have both W-2 and self-employment income should be sure to work with a qualified professional when calculating their Solo 401k contributions.   

Understanding and Tax Optimizing Your Solo 401k Contributions: Click here for an in-depth discussion of 401k contribution rules and regulations, as well as the tax factors that you should take into account to maximize the tax benefits of your Solo 401k plan.

Helpful IRS Resources For Solo 401k-QRP Plan Maintenance

Solo 401k & 199A QBI Tax Deduction

Every Checkbook Solo 401k investor is impacted by the tax innovation introduced by The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The key provision of Tax Reform for Solo 401k adopters to focus on is the new IRC 199A 20% Qualified Business Income – QBI – tax deduction. By definition Solo 401k and QBI go hand-in-hand – and  a Solo 401k can help you maximize the value of this impactful tax deduction. Continue reading “Solo 401k & 199A QBI Tax Deduction”

Solo 401k Contributions: Understanding & Optimizing

Solo 401k contributions to a Checkbook-Control Qualified Retirement Plan – a Checkbook QRP – have multiple tax benefits: (1) They are tax-deductible, reducing your taxable income & tax liability to the IRS and (2) they grow tax-deferred, with no annual taxes on earnings and profits within the Solo 401k.

Tax-deductible Solo 401(k) contributions consist of 2 components: (1) Employee Elective Deferrals and (2) Employer Non-Elective Contributions (profit sharing). However, you may have heard various other terms used to describe 401(k) Plan contribution types. Following is a comprehensive guide to Solo 401k contributions, terms,  and calculations. Continue reading “Solo 401k Contributions: Understanding & Optimizing”

Podcast: Solo 401k 2018 Year End Tax Strategy & FAQ

A Self-Directed Solo 401k With Checkbook Control is a powerful tax planning tool, providing $10,000’s – up to $122,000 of annual tax deductions. Since the passing of tax reform in 2017, the Checkbook 401k has become even more important, as a key tool for maximizing Section 199A Qualified Business Income 20% tax-deductions. For key 2018 year-end tax strategy and tips, listen to Commercial Real Estate Pro Network Show Episode 172: Solo 401K with Bernard Reisz and J Darrin Gross. Continue reading “Podcast: Solo 401k 2018 Year End Tax Strategy & FAQ”

Podcast: SDIRA Fundamentals & Advanced SDIRA Strategy

Fundamentals of IRAs Accounts, 401(k) Plans, Self-Directed IRAs, Self-Directed Checkbook IRAs, Traditional IRA, Roth IRA, Solo 401k Plans, Checkbook Solo 401k Plans…What are those and why does it matter? Bernard Reisz CPA and J Darrin Gross discuss the basics and advanced self-directed investing strategies on Commercial Real Estate Pro Network Radio Episode: Checkbook IRA with Bernard Reisz.

Continue reading “Podcast: SDIRA Fundamentals & Advanced SDIRA Strategy”

Podcast: Checkbook IRA & 401k For Real Estate Syndicators

Real Estate Syndication and Checkbook IRAs & Checkbook 401(k) Plans are the perfect match! Real estate syndicators raise capital for real estate deals and Self-Directed Retirement Accounts could, potentially, provide ~$28,000,000,000,000 to investment sponsors. Checkbook Control Retirement Accounts are the ideal bridge between those that need investment capital and those that have investable tax-sheltered assets.

Both syndicators and passive real estate investors will benefit from education about the incredible opportunity presented by Self-Directed IRAs and 401k plans, as well as the IRS guidelines that govern them. For a syndicator-centric perspective of SDIRA and SD401k real estate investing, listen to this episode of The Real Estate Syndication Show, hosted by real estate investor and syndicator Whitney Sewell of Life Bridge Capital. Continue reading “Podcast: Checkbook IRA & 401k For Real Estate Syndicators”

Crypto IRA and Crypto 401k Overview: Tax Free Bitcoin Interview

In this live radio broadcast, we discussed the fundamentals of Cryptocurrency taxation and tax-free Cryptocurrency retirement account investing. If you’d like to invest tax efficiently in Bitcoin (BTC), Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs), Bitcoin mining, and any other Blockchain venture, this podcast will give you the basics for doing so with Checkbook SDIRA and Solo 401K Plans.

The IRS published guidance regarding the tax treatment of virtual currencies in IRS Notice 2014-21. Cryptocurrency transactions, even when no “fiat” is received, are taxable events. For example, if a crypto investor trades Bitcoin for Ethereum, he may owe taxes on that trade – but the transaction will not have provided any US Dollars with which to pay the tax liability (the IRS does not yet accept crypto payment of taxes).

Crypto-mining has particularly unfavorable tax treatments as ordinary income. Self-directed retirement accounts, when properly structured, can be used to significantly improve the tax results of mining operations.

Best Ever Real Estate Show: Checkbook Self-Directed IRAs and Solo 401(k)s

For comprehensive info about Checkbook Control Retirement Accounts, including SDIRA & Solo 401k, listen to  Best Ever Real Estate Podcast: Using IRA’s & 401k’s To Invest In Real Estate with Bernard Reisz, hosted by Joe Fairless and the Best Ever Team. Continue reading “Best Ever Real Estate Show: Checkbook Self-Directed IRAs and Solo 401(k)s”

Checkbook Solo 401K: Year End 2017

Happy New Year to All!
 
2017 has been an exciting year for checkbook control – from the explosive emergence of Cryptocurrency to Tax Reform – we in the self-directed retirement community have had a stake in the evolution of the investment and tax landscape. In this post we’ll highlight how 2017 regulatory events relate to Checkbook Solo 401k investors and provide year-end tax planning tips.

Continue reading “Checkbook Solo 401K: Year End 2017”