Solo 401k & 199A QBI Tax Deduction

Every Checkbook Solo 401k investor is impacted by the tax innovation introduced by The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The key provision of Tax Reform for Solo 401k adopters to focus on is the new IRC 199A 20% Qualified Business Income – QBI – tax deduction. By definition Solo 401k and QBI go hand-in-hand – and  a Solo 401k can help you maximize the value of this impactful tax deduction. Continue reading “Solo 401k & 199A QBI Tax Deduction”

Solo 401k Contributions: Understanding & Optimizing

Solo 401k contributions to a Checkbook-Control Qualified Retirement Plan – a Checkbook QRP – have multiple tax benefits: (1) They are tax-deductible, reducing your taxable income & tax liability to the IRS and (2) they grow tax-deferred, with no annual taxes on earnings and profits within the Solo 401k.

Tax-deductible Solo 401(k) contributions consist of 2 components: (1) Employee Elective Deferrals and (2) Employer Non-Elective Contributions (profit sharing). However, you may have heard various other terms used to describe 401(k) Plan contribution types. Following is a comprehensive guide to Solo 401k contributions, terms,  and calculations. Continue reading “Solo 401k Contributions: Understanding & Optimizing”

Solo 401K Roth Contribution Q&A

What is a Roth Solo 401k Plan? What is a Solo 401k Plan?

Understanding Roth Solo 401(k)s requires that we first understand the basics of traditional Solo 401k plans. 401K Plans, creatively named after Section 401(K) of the Tax Code, are Defined Contribution qualified retirement plans that allow employees to choose (“elective deferral”) to contribute all or part of their compensation to a tax-advantaged account and exclude the amounts contributed from current taxable income. The tax code calls this a “cash or deferred arrangement,” or CODA. A 401k Plan can be combined with other types of plans, such as Defined Benefit and Cash Balance Plans, to maximize tax deductions and allow for multiple forms of plan contributions. The typical 401(k) Plan provides for  employer profit sharing contributions, in addition to employee contributions. Self-Directed Solo 401(k) Plans are 401(k) plans for businesses that don’t have full-time employees other than business owners and their spouses, which can be designed to include very attractive features such as Roth 401k Contributions and After-Tax Employee Contributions.

What is a Roth Solo 401k Plan?

Continue reading “Solo 401K Roth Contribution Q&A”